Yony Leyser, director of the documentary William S. Burroughs: A Man Within, which we screened during The 8th Berlin International Directors Lounge, is back with a new project:Desire will set you free, his second feature film, is based on a true story, and at times traveling into the realm of docufiction. The plot follows the relationship of an American writer of Israeli/Palestinian descent and a Russian aspiring artist working as a hustler, offering access to the city’s vibrant queer and underground scenes while examining the differences between expatriate and refugee life.
To set the film free Yony needs your support.
Desire will set you free at kickstarter (12 days to go)

Yony Leyser, director of the documentary William S. Burroughs: A Man Within, which we screened during The 8th Berlin International Directors Lounge, is back with a new project:Desire will set you free, his second feature film, is based on a true story, and at times traveling into the realm of docufiction. The plot follows the relationship of an American writer of Israeli/Palestinian descent and a Russian aspiring artist working as a hustler, offering access to the city’s vibrant queer and underground scenes while examining the differences between expatriate and refugee life.

To set the film free Yony needs your support.

Desire will set you free at kickstarter (12 days to go)

DL X the 10th Berlin International Directors Lounge is kindly supported by:

Directors Lounge Screening:Elaine TedescoWhisperingThursday, 31 July 201421:00Z-BarBergstraße 210115 Berlin-MitteThis is set of videos by Brasilian artist Elaine Tedesco, a selection of works created between 1988 - 2012 and a work in process that she is realizing in Berlin. Divided into 4 groups: Video performances, domestic video notes, conversations and photography, it shows estrangements on looks at the daily life. Elaine Tedesco currently stays in Berlin at an artistic residence promoted by Instituto Goethe.Artist Links:http://www.comum.com/elainetedesco/http://www.goethe.de/ins/br/poa/ver/res/de12352197.htmLinks:Directors Loungehttp://www.directorslounge.netDetails:http://www.richfilm.de/currentUpload/Z-Barhttp://www.z-bar.de

Directors Lounge Screening:

Elaine Tedesco
Whispering

Thursday, 31 July 2014
21:00
Z-Bar
Bergstraße 2
10115 Berlin-Mitte

This is set of videos by Brasilian artist Elaine Tedesco, a selection of works created between 1988 - 2012 and a work in process that she is realizing in Berlin. Divided into 4 groups: Video performances, domestic video notes, conversations and photography, it shows estrangements on looks at the daily life. Elaine Tedesco currently stays in Berlin at an artistic residence promoted by Instituto Goethe.


Artist Links:
http://www.comum.com/elainetedesco/
http://www.goethe.de/ins/br/poa/ver/res/de12352197.htm


Links:
Directors Lounge
http://www.directorslounge.net
Details:
http://www.richfilm.de/currentUpload/
Z-Bar
http://www.z-bar.de

Directors Lounge at Gallery On, Seoul / South Korea,
C.A.R. Network III, the innovative art fair, 9 July - 1 August 2014
Opening Reception: 9 July, 5 pm

Gallery On, B1 Young-chung Bd. 69 Sagan-dong Jongno-gu Seoul 110-190 Korea

Directors Lounge, the Berlin-based platform for contemporary art and media, presents selected single channel works at Gallery On, Seoul during the C.A.R. Network III. The looped installations range from classic short animation to gif-based online works and interactive processing, giving a glimpse into new tendencies of motion-based media art.
 
With video works by Sandra Becker01, Erdal Inci, Hara Katsiki, Hye Young Kim, Julia Murakami and Stephan Hilpert, Alan Smithee, Andre Werner

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• Directors Lounge • contemporary art and media   

a cloud of different, independent curated projects to present a wide variety of short, experimental works from many different genres.

in cooperation with:



Directors Lounge Screening:Philip Widmann und Karsten KrauseSzenarioThursday, 26 June 201421:00Z-BarBergstraße 210115 Berlin-MitteSzenario, a collaboration of the filmmakers Philip Widmann and Karsten Krause appears to be a documentation about a love affair; a chronicle of 3 months in fall 1970, when a married man called Hans starts an affair with his secretary, called Monica, also married.
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The main character of the film could be called “the suitcase”, though, a collection of notes, photographs, tickets and other papers from a suitcase, apparently collected by “him”, the male lover. The notes conof diary entries, where Hans meticulously wrote down every date he met with Monica, how long they had sex, and in which position they had intercourse. He also added to the record the places and circumstances they met, yet and always in the spare lasistnguage of a book keeper or bank clerk. The typewritten notes are spoken by a female voice, while the film images show passages of urban landscape of Köln, mostly slow tracking shots, some of them from car, and both at night and at day time.What looks like a straight documentary at first, however, turns out to be something altogether different if the viewer looks more precisely. It turns out to be a sophisticated narration that keeps irritating by indulging the viewer into the immersions of story telling on one hand, and showing doubts on its own media:contradictions in sound, picture and story telling. The techniques of irritation or Brecht-like alienation effects start right from the beginning. It is thus worth to try a more close reading from the beginning again, of the opening scenes of the film. A young woman with large red glasses starts reading from a script. -*°°*-  Full text at richfilm.deArtist Links:http://www.workscited.de/Links:Directors Loungehttp://www.directorslounge.netFull program details:http://www.richfilm.de/currentUpload/Z-Barhttp://www.z-bar.de

Directors Lounge Screening:

Philip Widmann und Karsten Krause
Szenario

Thursday, 26 June 2014
21:00
Z-Bar
Bergstraße 2
10115 Berlin-Mitte

Szenario, a collaboration of the filmmakers Philip Widmann and Karsten Krause appears to be a documentation about a love affair; a chronicle of 3 months in fall 1970, when a married man called Hans starts an affair with his secretary, called Monica, also married.

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Directors Lounge In Gear For C.A.R.

From Berlin straight out to the Ruhr, home to Germany’s concentrated multi-millions and “contemporary art ruhr,” a concentrated display of all that is here and now (and beyond) in the world of media art. C.A.R. spreads its considerable wings regularly, reaching a global tally of urban art-zones, but invites to its home turf in this bi-annual gathering of innovative thinkers. Directors Lounge has become a regular-as-clockwork contributor to the more daring summer fair, exporting its international imports and making the trip in person to see visitors through its specially curated mélange of onscreen marvels. The flicks selected join of a temporary world of razor-sharp installations, performance, photography and more, fodder for the wide-awake mind. With contributions from DL partner Cross Art (Zurich-Berlin) and more, a feast of film awaits at World Heritage Site Zollverein in Essen. Directors Lounge cordially invites you to electrify your senses.

Directors Lounge at the Car Video Lounge (Auditorium) with works by Engin Kilicatan, Tokomburu / Ion Papaspyrou and Zisis Kokkinidis, Zaoli Zhong, Hussen Ibraheem, Benedikt Kruger, Sebastian Lörscher, Xaver Xylophon, Aitor Marín Correcher, Jonathan Seyer, Jonathan Rescigno, AUJIK, Francesca Fini, Naren Wilks, Alberto Diaz Lopez, Hee-Seong Han, Hara Katsiki, APOTROPIA , Dimitris Argyriou, Studio Twins / Caroline Fayette & Chloé Guerbois, Elvira Bukowski, Gerard Freixes Ribera, Karl F. Stewart, Eleonora Manca, Michael Betancourt, Ingeborg Fülepp and Heiko Daxl, Mateo Grubisic, Haruka Mitani and Michael Lyons, Dunja Donassy and Bernd Wendt
Artists presented at the DL Booth:
Videos by  Peter Freund, Erdal Inci, Hye Young Kim, Mirco Magnani, Alan Smithee, Shinkan Tamaki
Photography / Paintings by Stefanie Anastase and Claudia Köhn, Jackie Baier, Julia Murakami, Karin Schranz, André Werner

Special lecture Sun 3pm: Digital storytelling , an introduction of RFID books that trigger interaction through the flipping of pages. Books by Sandra Becker and Bego Santiago presented by Dr. Regina Francken, FKI Berlin

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Directors Lounge Screening:Johanna Domkewith Marouan OmaraCairo TimesThursday, 29 May 201421:00Z-BarBergstraße 210115 Berlin-MitteCrop is an astounding video piece about a state-owned newspaper building in the center of Kairo. Filmed in 2012 shortly after the revolution in Egypt, the video represents an interesting, historic moment in time, and it is at the same time a reflection on image making and image representation in times of political changes regardless of local bounds or temporality.
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Set at the press house of Al Ahram (the Pyramids), a conservative newspaper that has been the national official press organ since President Nasser, the viewer is guided to explore the rooms of the house from the top down, following its hierarchy of places, literally from the representative offices down to the cellars with printing machines and packaging of newspaper bundles. While the camera unfolds step by step the complexities of a building, a photo-journalist talks about the beginnings of photo reportage in Egypt. He tells us he missed the revolution staying at the hospital. He speaks about the restrictions photo journalism has had to face from its beginning both from a conservative islamic society, and a regime controlling every publication. At first the journalist seem to be one person, but that is a fiction. His narration actually is a composition of 19 statements of different interviewed journalists, whose opinions differ in complex ways. The sound track of the film is comprised of two separate layers: the ambient sound that goes along with the passage of places that we follow inside the building, and on the other side the voice-over of the interviewed journalist. This voice-over creates a real contrapuntal montage in the sense of Eisenstein’s statement on sound film, whereas the ambient sound creates a poetic flow of images, a narrative of space.The film, a collaboration between the video artist Johanna Domke and the film director Marouan Omara, was in several ways a lucky moment. Domke had planned her residency in Kairo at Townhouse Gallery before the beginning of the Arabic revolution, and the filming itself, including all the preparations and necessary permissions, was only possible in that short period of time of changes before the new regime took control again. The film thus represents a unique time in history while at the same time it gives a comprehensible glimpse of what it is like to work as a journalist under the restrictions of censorship. As Johanna told me, the team always asked for where the censorship actually had taken place, and were always referred to a different department. There was no official censorship office or censorship management, it was just part of the system as a whole. In certain ways, the press house depicted in the film truly resembles Kafka’s castle, where the power never manifests. Watching the film on the other hand may also give the impression of utterly familiarity with the building and its subdivisions, its poetry of space, the familiarity of bureaucratic space. In “Poetics of Space” Gaston Bachelard talks about the philosophy of space using a big family house as an example, something I always felt to be imperfect at least in reference to modernity, and in certain ways, the film “Crop” completes the picture of a modern poetics of space.
The artist, Johanna Domke, will be available for Q&A.
Program:Cairo Times 12:23 min, 2013Crop 47:08 min, 2012Artist Links:www.johannadomke.netLinks:Directors Loungehttp://www.directorslounge.netFull program details:http://www.richfilm.de/currentUpload/Z-Barhttp://www.z-bar.de

Directors Lounge Screening:

Johanna Domke
with Marouan Omara
Cairo Times

Thursday, 29 May 2014
21:00
Z-Bar
Bergstraße 2
10115 Berlin-Mitte


Crop is an astounding video piece about a state-owned newspaper building in the center of Kairo. Filmed in 2012 shortly after the revolution in Egypt, the video represents an interesting, historic moment in time, and it is at the same time a reflection on image making and image representation in times of political changes regardless of local bounds or temporality.

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SCRUBBED TO THE SURFACE
Adrián Onco Orduna peels back layers on story-telling in Vestigios
by Kenton Turk
Orduna’s Vestigios (“Vestiges”) perplexes. In truth, it seduces without obvious charm before it perplexes. Scenes envelop and inhabit before revealing the traces of a narrative, thereby proving the title accurate. There is however steady advancement here – images collecting to have a cumulative value that nonetheless does not suffer under its own weight, somewhat akin to the progressive effect of a Fibonacci number: the ever-growing sum of the preceding two. 
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As such, a linear storyline remains before the door. But from lower reaches, a kind of narrative emerges, a celluloid palimpsest, the vague but profound reflections of a life led and by its end just perhaps grasped in terms of its most affecting components. What perplexes, to the credit of the film, is the fact that it provokes the sensation of a story being told without a discernable one being in evidence. The method used mimics closely the reductionism of a thought process, reversing the bottom-up superimposition of standard film art. This is the minimal, initial layer of storytelling. Vestigios initially seems like the bare bones of a film concept, the backdrops and the settings stripped of the actors, stripped of the dialogue, stripped of even those details that are intended to key viewers into a returning scene of action. It is as though the filmmaker decided his film was overloaded and continued reducing the ornamentation, until he reached a point that was far beyond his intention, but that proved eminently more satisfying than the combination of plot, dialogue and ambient noise: the true and elemental story at the core, the moments that remain when freed of a harnessing structure.
The reference points here are compositional signposts, static imagery with a hint of life breathed into them: starkly symmetrical images (rolling escalators, paired telephones, views down walled alleyways) move ever so slightly, the breathing of a cameraman, possibly, the playfulness of breeze, shifting light. Or your imagination. A mask that regards you with immobile features seems to move its eyes, slightly, after some long moments borne in increasing discomfort by the intensity of a stare that is without vision. Urban settings become vaguely disturbung (yet paradoxically comforting) for not being completely deserted, but being occupied by people heard but never in view, always behind walls and around corners. It is as though you, moving through these locales, have been summoned to be near but not enter.
For all of this, Vestigios is not in lack of anything. It can simultaneously be seen as a stark paring down of the film process and a deepening of pure content. The images accompany lyricism (appearing in interspersed Chinese characters as title cards) that sounds as spare to the Western ear as the images feel in visual terms. These move through philosophical musings and reflections on existence itself. “A long journey, a reflection, a fragrance… I leave submission behind” opens these ruminations. Questions posed (“Maybe everything is mere interpretation?”), questions answered (“The path is marked out”) and personal revelations (“I sought nudity so that nothing would hold me back”) counterpoint the barren images. Thus, the plotless story is unravelled. As well, the spartan soundtrack moves the “action” forward, with subtlety and without haste. A drumbeat evolves into heartbeat, and occasional din resolves itself in sudden silences.
In this way, Orduna combines the spare, observational qualities of Edison’s “actualities” and the torpid uneasiness of Lynch in a film that neither tells a story nor avoids telling one. These are the thoughts at the back of one’s head, ultimately more profound for not being expressible with simple and linear language, collecting and extending themselves to buoy up a core oxymoronically nebulous and defined.
Finally, Orduna turns the optical refuge of black and white into colour, golden tones moving towards blue. The film ends with this move into another sphere of reference, from two-dimensional monochromatism to three-dimensional chromatism, making one want to view the preceding again with the acquired knowledge of another level of vision. Reflection is inevitable, surely Orduna’s intention. Achieved with elegance and the most deceptively complex simplicity.

Vestigios was screened in World Premiere at [DLX], the 10th Berlin International Directors Lounge on 11 February 2014.

SCRUBBED TO THE SURFACE

Adrián Onco Orduna peels back layers on story-telling in Vestigios

by Kenton Turk

Orduna’s Vestigios (“Vestiges”) perplexes. In truth, it seduces without obvious charm before it perplexes. Scenes envelop and inhabit before revealing the traces of a narrative, thereby proving the title accurate. There is however steady advancement here – images collecting to have a cumulative value that nonetheless does not suffer under its own weight, somewhat akin to the progressive effect of a Fibonacci number: the ever-growing sum of the preceding two.

Read More